Revegetation

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Revegetation.jpg
Revegetation is a broad term that describes a variety of practices that we use to modifying vegetation. A typical revegetation effort involves three general components: a disturbance to create a niche to introduce new species, propagation of that species onto the site with seeds, cuttings, or rooted stock, and some kind of aftercare (either supplemental water and nutrients, or more disturbance) to favor the introduced species. While we are focused on discrete projects, revegetation occurs in the context of natural vegetation evolution, driven by climate, hydrology, genetics, dispersal, competition, stress, and ongoing disturbance regime. This page is a master topic page to organize information on the wiki to support revegetation practice.

Related Pages:

Shared Resources

Species Composition

What resources do we have for designing target vegetation composition?

Freshwater Tidal

There are notably few resources for designing composition and structure of freshwater tidal vegetation.

Disturbance and Soil Restoration

How to we create space in the field suitable for propagation?

Propagation and Planting Technique

How do we efficiently introduce species into a vegetation?

Aftercare Strategies

How to we favor target composition after propagation?

Regional Suppliers

The following workgroups provide materials

Evaluation and Monitoring

How do we qualitatively and quantitatively observe vegetation?

  • Elzinga et al 1998 provides a strong basis in monitoring species populations as well as studying communities.

Species

Flora pages describe what we know about individual species listed by Genus


Species

Vegetation describe documents and topics related to vegetation dynamics